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Fujitsu and Wakayama Medical University start joint trials for millimeter-wave sensor to detect falls of elderly patients

Tuesday, November 22, 2022

Fujitsu and Wakayama Medical University today announced the start of joint trials of a technology to support nurses and caregivers in visually monitoring patients in privacy-sensitive contexts, including hospital rooms and nursing facilities. The technology leverages Fujitsu’s technique for accurately estimating postures of the human body using a millimeter-wave sensor and Fujitsu’s "Actlyzer"(1) AI technology for analysis of complex human behaviors. Using a millimeter-wave sensor to gather point cloud data and no cameras, Fujitsu’s technology will help to support nurses and caregivers to monitor patients and achieve a faster response to emergency situations including falls and possible serious injuries while ensuring patients’ privacy.

Fujitsu will analyze data obtained through the trials and further refine its technology based on analysis results evaluated by Wakayama Medical University, drawing on the Wakayama Medical University’s knowledge from the medical field.

Based on these results, the two parties aim to offer a millimeter-wave sensor service for privacy-conscious monitoring to hospitals and nursing facilities in fiscal 2023. Ultimately, the two parties hope to contribute to enrich people’s lives by realizing an environment in which elderly people can enjoy greater independence and privacy without sacrificing their personal safety.

Technology to contribute to reducing the risk of serious injuries for the elderly
In fiscal 2021, the Japan Hospital Association (2) counted a total of 290 falls per month at 18 hospitals in Japan. Although these numbers highlight the risk of falls and injuries of elderly people and the need for patient monitoring, monitoring technologies using cameras remain difficult to install in highly private spaces such as hospitals and nursing homes.

To address this challenge, Fujitsu and Wakayama Medical University started joint trials at actual facilities for the elderly to contribute to reducing the risk of serious injuries such as bone fractures by supporting nurses and caregivers in monitoring patients and achieving a faster response to emergency situations while ensuring patients’ privacy.

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